"Things necessary to be continually had in remembrance"

Speech Sub-titles:

INTRODUCT ION
       
MOTILAL  SETALVAD      
TODAY’S TOPIC      
CANONS
Versus PRINCIPLES  

   "JUDICIAL ETHICS A definition"    
"
ATTEMPTED CODIFICATION OF CANONS OF JUDICIAL ETHICS"

   "Things necessary to be continually had in remembrance"     
"
THE CONCEPT OF JUDGESHIP IN GITA"

 

               
Hon’ble Shri R.C. Lahoti,
 
Chief Justice of India  
First M.C. Setalvad Memorial Lecture
 
Tuesday, 22nd Februa ry, 2005.     
at The Gulmohar Hall, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road,  New Delhi . India.

[ for exact contents of Lecture visit official web site of Supreme Court of India http://www.supremecourtofindia.nic.in/judges_speech]

Speech Sub-titles:

 "THREE DOCUMENTS :     
(i) Restatement of Values of Judicial Life (1999)     
                                                                       (ii) The Bangalore Draft Principles  
 
(iii) The oath or affirmation by Judge
"

    "Oath of a Judge _  analysed "     "Independence and Impartiality"         
"
Four Qualities in a Judge" 

 "Conduct of Judge in private"     "Patience and Tolerance" 
"Rational Utilisation of  Time"       "EPILOGUE"

"Things necessary to be continually had in remembrance"

The book ‘Lives of the Chief Justices of England’ (published, in 1858), reproduced the qualities of a Judge written in his own handwriting by Lord Hale which he had laid down for his own conduct as a Judge.  He wrote,[12] ___

  Things necessary to be continually had in remembrance.

 

“1.  That in the administration of justice I am intrusted for God, the King, and country; and therefore,

 

“2.  That it be done, 1. uprightly; 2. deliberately; 3. resolutely.

 

“3.  That I rest not upon my own understanding or strength, but implore and rest upon the direction and strength of God.

 

“4.  That in the execution of justice I carefully lay aside my own passions, and not give way to them, however provoked.

 

“5. That I be wholly intent upon the business I am about, remitting all other cares and thoughts as unseasonable and interruptions.  “And, while on the Bench, not writing letters or reading newspapers.”

 

“6. That I suffer not myself to be prepossessed with any judgment at all, till the whole business and both parties be heard.

 

“7. That I never engage myself in the beginning of any cause, but reserve myself unprejudiced till the whole be heard.

 

“8. That in business capital, though my nature prompt me to pity, yet to consider there is a pity also due to the country.

 

“9. That I be not too rigid in matters purely conscientious, where all the harm is diversity of judgment.

 

“10. (Not reproduced)

 

“11. That popular or court applause or distaste have no influence in anything I do, in point of distribution of justice.

 

“12. Not to be solicitous what men will say or think, so long as I keep myself exactly according to the rule of justice.

 

“13. (Not reproduced)

 

“14. (Not reproduced)

 

“15. (Not reproduced)

 

“16. To abhor all private solicitations, of what kind soever, and by whomsoever, in matters  depending.

 

“17. (Not reproduced)

 

“18. To be short and sparing at meals, that I may be the fitter for business.”

 

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[8]  E.C. GERHART, Quote It,  p.300

[9]  M. Rama Jois, Trivarga Siddhanta, p.85. 

[10] Nyay Diary, 1976

[11] E.C. GERHART, Quote It, p.289

[12] E.C. GERHART, Quote It, pp 297-298